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Congratulations Ravenscote Junior

Congratulations Ravenscote Junior

Congratulations to Ravenscote Junior School in Frimley, Surrey on renewing their Coachmark Award at the same level showing how they sustain excellence and keep progressing.

 During our visit we were invited to a parent and pupil workshop on coaching in the classroom. There was a tangible buzz as pupils shared their strengths and goals with their parents. Lead School Coach, Dawn Wallace shared ideas on how to use questioning and listening skills to get children talking about their learning at school.

 

Dawn told us, ‘Over time our use of pupil peer coaching and this questioning culture is continuously impacting the way that we work with the children, helping them to become more confident in their ability to problem-solve, consider options for solutions and pick those that they perceive as most beneficial for themselves and those around them. In essence – to become resilient learners.’

 

Ravenscote is one of only a handful of schools in the country who have achieved the Coachmark Gold Award. 

 

The Coachmark Team

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

 

Conditions to flourish

Conditions to flourish

People deliver great results ‘when they feel really, really valued, not when they feel really, really inspected’!

Experienced Head of English and Advanced Skills Teacher, Sarah Ryce, shares her thoughts with us:

In George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, Eliza Doolittle explains:
‘You see, really and truly, apart from the things anyone can pick up (the dressing and the proper way of speaking, and so on), the difference between a lady and a flower girl is not how she behaves but how she’s treated. I shall always be a flower girl to Professor Higgins because he always treats me as a flower girl and always will; but I know I can be a lady to you because you always treat me as a lady and always will.’

Being able to spot and nurture potential in our staff is vital if we are to build exceptional schools. To get a business perspective on this, read J. Sterling Livingston’s article ‘Pygmalion in Management’. Livingston explores the transformative power of leaders’ expectations on their colleagues, and the crucial importance of developing young staff.

I recommend Stephanie S. Tolan’s article ‘Is it a Cheetah?’. Although it is about gifted and talented young people, it rings true when thinking about staff development. Tolan takes the metaphor of a caged cheetah to argue that a cheetah will always be the fastest land animal – no matter whether it is caged or free. It may not appear to be the fastest land animal when it is caged, but this does not make it any less a cheetah. It simply lacks the right conditions. Read this in the light of staff development, and the challenge is clear: do we really believe in the potential of our colleagues to be phenomenal teachers? If so, do we provide them with the right conditions to flourish?

The Coachmark Team

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

Why coaching?

Why coaching?

What is it that motivates a school or an individual to explore coaching and make the decision to introduce coaching across the school? Here’s a story to inspire you!


The first school in the country to achieve the Coachmark award started their coaching journey immediately after an Ofsted inspection. The inspection had gone very well. So well, that someone had the audacity to say: 
“Well, there’s only one way to go now isn’t there? Down!”


This prompted the Headteacher and school to look for the best ways of sustaining and further improving standards. They made coaching their focus.

 

West Ewell Infant School and Nursery in Surrey went on to achieve the Gold Coachmark Award and recently, after holding the award for 3 years, they were reassessed and retained their Gold Award status.

 

What inspires and motivates you with regard to coaching?

What impact is coaching having in your school?

 

The Coachmark Team

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

Congratulations Ravenscote Junior

Congratulations Boxgrove

The coaching vision and mission at Boxgrove Primary School in Surrey ensures that every member of staff has access to developmental conversations – and staff speak highly of the effectiveness and motivation of this process. Ultimately of course, coaching is intrinsically linked to outcomes for children and there is an established way of thinking at Boxgrove that these outcomes are improved if the staff team is positive, skilled and empowered to make a difference.

Year 6 children apply by letter and interview for roles and responsibilities within the school and one of these is as Learning Champion to support younger children in the school to improve their learning. All Learning Champions receive high quality internal training on ‘The Power of Coaching’ and regular support for their role which , when we met during our visit, they spoke of with great understanding and pride in their achievements with comments like: ”It’s about them not you.’

Congratulations to all at Boxgrove for achieving the Coachmark Award and for the many ways in which a coaching approach is threaded through the fabric of your school!

 

The Coachmark Team

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

Powerful Research Findings From USA

Powerful Research Findings From USA

This research offers powerful evidence for the use of a coaching approach to develop learning and teaching and have a massive impact on school improvement.

Jim Knight, Researcher at the University of Kansas Centre for Research on Learning conducted a 5 year study on staff development looking at the impact various approaches had on the implementation of new teaching strategies.

The research found that when teachers are given only a description of new instructional skills, e.g. they attend a workshop, 10% went on to use the new skill in the classroom. When modelling, further practice and feedback were added to the training, implementation increased by 2% to 3% each time. When coaching was added to the staff development, approximately 95% of the teachers implemented the new skills in their classrooms.

In a nutshell, the rate of transfer into classroom practice following peer coaching alongside other forms of professional development was as follows:

Workshop only 10%
Workshop & modelling 12 – 13%
Workshop, modelling & practice 14 – 16%
Workshop, modelling, practice & feedback 16 – 19%
Workshop, modelling, practice, feedback & peer coaching 95%

 

Let us know your thoughts and experience with this. Does the research ring a bell with you? Does it support your vision for your school?

 

 

The Coachmark Team

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

Powerful feedback and reflection tool

Powerful feedback and reflection tool

 

Following on from our Battered, Bruised and Inadequate email we want to share a coaching tool which will help you to get the most from a feedback session – whether you’re giving or receiving the feedback. This tool offers questions to support and challenge thinking so that feedback is effective and achieves positive results WITHOUT causing major feelings of inadequacy. It encourages us to examine positive and negative aspects of feedback and link back to what we know about ourselves and what we don’t know and could do with exploring more fully.

 

 

 

Expected

Unexpected

Positive

We often know what we do well because we receive regular positive feedback about these things. Instead of simply hearingthis praise and doing nothing with it – ask yourself these questions:

 

  • How can I celebrate this?
  • How can I use this to further improve my practice?
  • How can I use this to help others?

Receiving positive feedback that we don’t expect is like a surprise birthday present. After the initial joy, it’s important to examine it further by asking yourself these questions:

 

  • What am I most pleased about to hear this?
  • How will I celebrate this?
  • How can I build on this?

Negative

We’re often aware of some of the areas that need improvement. To apply this expected feedback and make a positive change, ask these questions:

 

  • What actions have I already taken to address this concern?
  • How successful were those actions?
  • What else do I need to do?
  • If I don’t make the necessary changes, how will this impact my practice/ placement/ results?

This feedback is the most difficult to hear and understand. It can also be the source of much self-discovery, if we’re open to it. This unexpected feedback often comes from areas that we don’t want to acknowledge and can cause strong emotions. When we learn to deal with it we can take big steps forward. Ask these questions:

 

  • What other information do I need to make sense of the feedback?
  • What support do I need to deal with the implications?
  • What plan can I put in place to make small, achievable changes in the short term?
  • How will improving this impact other areas of my placement or life?

 

 

 

Let us know how this works for you.

 

  

 

The Coachmark Team

 

Coachmark supports schools in achieving excellence and recognition through the use of their coaching practices. Contact us for further information: info@coachmark.org.uk

 

info@coachmark.org.uk